Style Solution:  Explore these tips about steaming wrinkles away, ironing safely and efficiently and newer at-home dry cleaning processes.

STEAMING is a great way to freshen a garment without a trip to the dry-cleaners. After a day’s wear, hang your garment and remove sit-down wrinkles and elbow creases with a strong but gently flow of steam. It’s also great for re-setting pleats and creases.  Steaming takes just moments, and avoids any scorching or shine that can develop when you use a conventional iron, especially on delicate fabrics.

I like the Jiffy Steamer portable model.  You can see it in action in this video and order one at JiffySteamer.com.  The $75 price may seem steep, but it’s a bargain compared to the dry-cleaner trips it can save.  And if you enter the code IMAG37 you’ll get free shipping.

One client shared this nifty tip – she helps get sit-down and back-of-knee wrinkles out of her trousers by hanging them from the hem edge so the weight of the waistband/pocket area is pulling down on the wrinkled areas.  Sometimes she even adds a second clip hanger to the waistband edge for extra weight.

Read about safe ironing and at-home dry cleaning in other posts.  And find extensive details about clothing care and wardrobe development in LOOKING GOOD … Every Day.

About Nancy Nix Rice

I help other women feel confident about how they look every day - regardless of their age, budget, lifestyle or the size tag in their pants - so they put wardrobe concerns on the back burner and go share their gifts with the world.

2 Comments

  1. Christina on January 4, 2020 at 1:13 pm

    I hesitate to buy or sew nice garments—quality wools and silks, highly structured garments, etc.—because the dry cleaners in our area are so incompetent. They have ruined many garments of mine over the years: a silk shantung toile print blazer (colors ran), a plush wool coat (felted the fabric), a wool flannel skirt (shrank, wrong pleats pressed in hard), a vintage faille jacket (frayed, wrinkles pressed in hard, lining torn), a silk crepe Chanel-style blouse (rough treatment created a hole), etc. etc. Ruined and unwearable! The vintage jacket was destroyed by a highly recommended, very expensive speciality dry cleaner in Menlo Park. I would like to wear fine clothes, but all my money will be wasted if the dry cleaner destroys them. So I wear a lot of washable Lands End clothes.

    • Nancy Nix Rice on January 4, 2020 at 2:49 pm

      Oh my goodness – what a string of disasters. No wonder you are feeling frustrated. My two suggestions would be to dry clean less often and to ask the nicest sstores in your area what cleaner they recommend. But obviously neither of those is a guarantee. And if you are sewing things yourself you have the option of pre-washing the fabric (obviously not every fabbric, but some of them anyway) so that the garment will be washable – without fear of shrinking – shen ut’s done.

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